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Warm-up email account before sending out cold emails

April 12, 2022

For any cold email that you send to prospects, email deliverability stands crucial. It especially becomes important when you’re engaged in email campaigns. As per a report of SuperOffice, about 20% of emails you send do not reach the prospects’ inboxes. 

 

There remains also the problem of email accounts getting blocked when the email campaign starts with an email. The issue faced by the marketing teams—the new emails created more than often don’t warm up that easily. 

 

With the latest update from Google, most emails go into spam—making it even harder for such emails to make it to the inbox! 

 

To avoid any of these unforeseen situations, we want you to start planning on a cold email outreach campaign that’s essentially carried out to warm the new email accounts. 

What we want to tell you in this blog is how you can warm the email account so that all your cold emails end up in the inbox of prospects, instead of their spam folders! 

How to warm up your emails?

Warming up emails is how you establish a reputation for a new email account and increase the email sending limit.

The process generally starts with sending emails from a new email account, with handful of emails, and gradually increase the number of emails sent each day. With creating a new email account, the email service provider provides fresh sending limits. But, if you want to create a new email account—that’s a bit difficult. 

 

Warming up emails is essential to find the full potential of each email. Build a good reputation by warming up your emails. Maximum deliverability can be achieved in a matter of about 8-12 weeks. Warming process usually depends on two major factors—email volume and engagement. The sooner these two happen, the faster the email warms up. 

 

Here is why warming up email is important—

 

Email warmup is crucial because it builds a reputation for your domain and help achieve a higher delivery rate. It’s particularly important when you’re about to send a large volume of cold emails—ensure that your new account is warm for the emails to land up in the inboxes. In an email campaign, the aim is to reach to the inbox of recipients. When you’re successful in building a good engagement with the recipients, it in turn builds a more significant relationship.

 

A higher open rate for every email means more responses for you. 

 

How to warm up email accounts before sending them as cold email campaigns?

 

Down below are the steps by which you can warm up the new email account you create!

 

  1. Remember to authenticate the account

 

 Account authentication is nothing but protecting your account from spam filters, ensuring that the emails land up in the inbox. SPF, DKIM, DMARC, and custom domain are authentication standards that assure you that your emails are not going to go in the spam folders!

 

  1. Sending emails one at a time

 

At the beginning of sending emails, better to send personalized emails for each one of your prospects. Ensure there’s consistent engagement with the carefully new-built contacts. Increase the volume of emails and get ready to start with your email campaigns! Build good reputation by sending emails to all email services. 

 

  1. Conversation threads

 

Email accounts are not only meant to send emails, but get responses too! Create engagement with the prospects and have regular conversations going on for about 8-12 weeks. 

 

  1. Subscribe to newsletters

 

Subscribing to multiple newsletters will fetch you a lot of benefits. Every newsletter will need a confirmation and get back to the inbox. Validate your account and increase the flow of email. Receiving emails regularly is important than warming the new email account. 

 

Conclusion

 

Following the best practices will ensure that you’re a human being and not a spammer. It is always ideal to build a good email reputation as a sender. 

 

 

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